Monday, September 30, 2019

Aromatherapy and Fragrance for Stress Relief


https://www.perfume.com/article-guide-to-aromatherapy-and-fragrance-for-stress-relief


Dr. Pierre Milot, PhD., PhD. (tc)
Therapeutic / Grief Recovery Counsellor
Certified Medical Cannabis Counsellor
Winchester ON.
Tel: 613.774.4389
E-mail:
drpierremilot@mail.com
Website:
http://www.coaching4life.ca

Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Cannabis 101: Part 8

Sponsored by:
Winchester Bed & Breakfast
www.winchesterbb.com


Alcohol


Mixing alcohol with virtually any drug is generally not a good idea. In fact, mixing it with some drugs (particularly opioids and central nervous system depressants like benzodiazepines, barbiturates, and sleep meds) can prove fatal.

But, what about alcohol and cannabis? There’s no doubt: cannabis and alcohol is a popular combination. But what does the research say? Is mixing these two substances okay?

Overall, drawing a conclusion based on available research is subject to interpretation and personal biases. The same studies can be interpreted positively or negatively, depending on your perspective. On the one hand, studies have provided compelling evidence that alcohol increases blood THC levels (although no evidence suggests the converse–that THC increases blood alcohol levels). On the other hand, some research suggests people consume less alcohol when they use cannabis.


These two findings aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, they make sense. If THC reacts to alcohol by potentiating the desired effects on mood, then one would need less alcohol.

A study published by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), Alcohol and Marijuana: Concordance of Use by Men and Women that examined consumption pattern differences in three different environments (only alcohol is available, only cannabis is available, both are available).

Here’s what they found:

- 14 out 16 subjects drank significantly less alcohol when both alcohol and cannabis were         available (compared to when only alcohol was available)

- 12 of the 16 subjects consumed slightly more cannabis when both were available (compared to when only cannabis was available)

Basically, when people have access to both substances, their consumption patterns change: they smoke a little bit more, but they drink a lot less! It was a small study, so we can’t necessarily generalize the findings; however, they do seem consistent with most people’s experiences.

That being said, one still needs to be cautious. For one, alcohol and cannabis together pose even greater dangers driving than when using either one independently. Second, if someone has had too much to drink–to the point they need to vomit to expel the toxins–know that cannabis inhibits nausea and vomiting. By preventing yourself from vomiting, you’re putting yourself at greater risk of suffering from alcohol toxicity.

Article by:
Dr. Pierre Milot, PhD., PhD. (tc)
Life Transitions / Grief Recovery Counsellor
CBD-Rich Hemp Sales Consultant
Redmond House, Winchester ON.
Tel: 613.774.4389
E-mail:
drpierremilot@mail.com
Website:
http://www.coaching4life.ca


Sunday, March 24, 2019

Cannabis 101: Part 7

Sponsored by:
Winchester Bed & Breakfast
www.winchesterbb.com


Drugs That Affect Blood Sugar Levels
Interestingly, there is evidence to suggest cannabis may decrease insulin resistance, improve the metabolic process, and improve blood sugar control.

Although we don’t have conclusive evidence, it’s possible cannabis may work together with other drugs favourably. But, by the same token, there could be a risk that cannabis combined with other drugs could lower glucose levels too much. Clearly, patients should continually monitor the effects (under medical supervision) to mitigate potential risks and adjust medication appropriately.

Drugs That Lower Blood Pressure
One of the major features of THC is that it simultaneously activates the CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors. Activating both receptors induces a cardiovascular stress response that can elevate cardiac oxygen consumption while reducing blood flow in coronary arteries. While reports of adverse events are relatively rare, patients who are taking blood pressure medication should be aware that cannabis may compound effects.

Drugs That Increase Risk of Bleeding
Both THC and CBD may increase the effect of drugs used for blood thinning (e.g. warfarin or heparin), or drugs known to carry their own risk of blood thinning (e.g. ibuprofen, naproxen, etc.). How?  By possibly slowing down the metabolism of these drugs.

|Opioids
Most studies suggest there is a bidirectional modulatory relationship between the bodys natural opioid system and the bodys natural cannabinoid system (the endocannabinoid system. The pain-relieving properties of cannabis are well-established, and many medical professionals have come forward to suggest cannabis (as an alternative pain medication) could play a role in stemming the overuse of prescription (and illicit) opioids.

There’s no question. From an abuse potential and toxicity perspective, cannabis as a substitute to narcotic pain medications would be a far better  first-line drug for management of chronic pain.

However, what about as an adjunct to opioid therapy?  How does cannabis measure up?  Could cannabis reduce a patient’s reliance on opioids, or would combining the two elevate risk of concurrent dependency or abuse?

Examining the subjective effects of vaporized cannabis in conjunction with opioids, Dr. Donald Abrams, an oncologist from UC, San Francisco, and his team published a small study in 2011. They found no significant change in opioid blood level concentrations after exposure to cannabis. Moreover, patients reported a 27% decrease in pain following cannabis administration.

Abrams concluded that cannabis can, in fact, safely augment the pain-relieving effects of opioids. His team also found that combining opioids and cannabis may allow for treating patients with lower opioid doses while reducing risk of dependency and fewer side effects. *Several other studies, which we’ll explore further in an upcoming series, support the findings from Abrams’ study.

Article by:
Dr. Pierre Milot, PhD., PhD. (tc)
Life Transitions / Grief Recovery Counsellor
CBD-Rich Hemp Sales Consultant
Redmond House, Winchester ON.
Tel: 613.774.4389
E-mail:
drpierremilot@mail.com
Website:
http://www.coaching4life.ca


Friday, March 15, 2019

Cannabis 101: Part 6

Sponsored by:
Winchester B&B

Side Effects and Safety: CBD Vs THC

The psychoactive properties of THC can cause temporary side effects:
 Memory impairments
 Lowered reaction time
Increased heart rateCoordination problems
Dry mouth
Red eyes

While there is a risk of some negative side effects from THC, according to the National Cancer Institute it is not possible to have a fatal overdose. Some studies have found evidence that cannabis strains high in THC can cause long-term negative psychiatric effects when consumed by adolescents, including increasing the risk of psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia.

Research indicates even large doses of CBD are well tolerated and safe. There have been some reports of dry mouth, light-headedness, and drowsiness. A recent research review examining the safety and side effects of CBD concluded that CBD appeared to be safe in humans and animals. Even chronic use of CBD by humans showed to cause no adverse neurological, psychiatric, or clinical effects.

CBD and THC Drug Interactions

Virtually all chemical compounds, from over-the-counter drugs and prescription pharmaceuticals to illicit substances, interact with other compounds. There are, for example, 82 identified drug interactions

with caffeine (of which 25 are classified as moderately severe to severe). Even seemingly benign substances, like grapefruit, are known to interact with many prescription drugs. When it comes to cannabis, most potential interactions that have been identified are relatively mild. And, in fact, some drugs seem to work together with cannabis favourably.

* But, before we dive deep on some of the most common drugs people combine with cannabis, it’s important to understand the difference between an “additive” and “synergistic” effect. Additive simply means the interaction between two chemicals equals the sum of their parts (e.g. 1+1 = 2). Synergistic means that when two chemicals interact, the effect is greater than the sum of their parts (e.g. 1+1 = 3. Sounds like “alternative math!”). Likewise, keep in mind that THC /CBD ratios and different strain profiles (with variable cannabinoid and terpene profiles) can influence effects.

Note: in some cases, cannabis may actually increase the effectiveness or potency of other drugs. But, even if the interaction is potentially beneficial, close monitoring by a medical professional, along with regular blood work, is important as a patient may need adjust their dosing accordingly.


Article by:
Dr. Pierre Milot, PhD., PhD. (tc)
Life Transitions / Grief Recovery Counsellor
CBD-Rich Hemp Sales Consultant
Redmond House, Winchester ON.
Tel: 613.774.4389
E-mail:
drpierremilot@mail.com
Website: http://www.coaching4life.ca

Monday, March 11, 2019

Cannabis 101: Part 5

Sponsored by:
Winchester B&B
https://winchesterbedandbreakfast.com/


Where CBD Comes From

CBD can be derived from both the industrial hemp plant (male cannabis crop) and the female marijuana plant.  The hemp plant does not have resinous, cannabinoid-packed flowers, but the rest of the plant does contain some cannabidiol amongst the stalk, leaves and more.

Industrial hemp derived CBD products are typically lower in cannabidiol concentration for this reason, while extracts from the marijuana plant can be much more potent and rich, being that they are made from the resinous parts of the buds, which are full of cannabinoids.

* However, a special extraction process must be utilized in order to separate the CBD from the other cannabinoids present in the marijuana plant. This process is typically quite complicated and requires a wealth of knowledge, experience and the proper equipment to do it well.

For this reason, it is really important to consume a certified non-psychoactive cannabidiol product if you want to ensure you will not also be receiving some of the high effects from THC.

Where THC Comes From

THC only comes from very specific portions of the female cannabis plant, or marijuana crop. It is present primarily on the resinous flowers of the plant, mostly the sugar leaves, colas, buds, calyxes/bracts and trichomes.

Very high potency THC marijuana strains typically take on a frosty appearance, meaning that they contain a higher concentration of trichomes, which is what gives this crystalline look.

This is why smoking a water leaf or stalk of the cannabis plant probably won’t get you high, because there simply is not a high enough concentration of resin or trichomes in these regions, meaning little to no THC either.

Additionally, THC needs to be heated, or “decarboxylated,” in order to be activated. This is why eating buds raw won’t cause much of an effect, while smoking, cooking, baking or lighting up is how the high is able to hit you.

More Info

CBD works in concert with THC, augmenting its medical effects and moderating its psychoactive effects.  Some researchers think that CBD has anti-psychotic properties which tend to reduce anxiety and panic reactions to THC.  It is also considered to improve wakefulness (sharper mind) and to supplement THC’s activity against pain and spasticity (tightness, stiffness, or pull of muscles).  Pretreatment with CBD in mice nearly tripled the levels of THC in their brains which is an indication that it can increase the action and effectiveness of other drugs. 

If taken by itself, CBD has anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety, anti-epileptic, sedative and neuro-protective properties.  It’s also quite a powerful antioxidant and can protect against chemical damage due to oxidation.  Lab and animal tests have suggested that CBD could even protect against the incurrence of the following diseases: diabetes, certain types of cancer rheumatoid arthritis, brain and nerve damage as a result of a stroke, alcoholism, Huntington’s disease, and even infections like “Mad Cow”.  Other evidence suggests that CBD is biphasic, meaning that its effectiveness diminishes if the dose is too high or too low.

NOTE

* CBD is one of the major ingredients in ‘Sativex’, the cannabis spray the UK-based GW Pharmaceuticals is developing.  The spray contains equal parts of CBD and THC and as been approved for the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis in Canada.

Marijuana that’s sold to consumers has significantly lower levels of CBD because growers tend to selectively breed out the CBD enzyme to produce more THC.

Article by:

Dr. Pierre Milot, PhD, PhD (tc)
Life Transition Counselling / CBD Sales Consulting
Grief Recovery – Clinical Hypnotherapy
Winchester Ontario
Tel: 613 774 4389
www.coaching4life.ca

Thursday, March 7, 2019

Cannabis 101: Part 4

Sponsored by:
Winchester B&B
https://winchesterbedandbreakfast.com/

Cultivation

Hemp and marijuana are grown for different uses, and therefore require different growing conditions.
Medical cannabis has been selectively bred over generations, and its characteristics are optimized in its cultivation environment to produce female flowering plants that yield budding flowers at the flowering stage of their life cycle,
In contrast, hemp plants are primarily male, without representing flowering buds at any stage in their life cycle.  Instead, centuries of selective breeding have resulted in relatively low concentrations of THC, and tall, fast growing plants optimized for higher stalk harvests.

* Achieving maximum THC levels in marijuana is tricky and requires close attention to grow-room conditions. Marijuana growers usually aim to maintain stable light, temperature, humidity, CO2 and oxygen levels, among other things.
On the other hand, hemp is usually grown outdoors to maximize its size and yield and less attention is paid to individual plants.

A Bit About the Anatomy of the Marijuana Plant
Most people know that THC is only present in the female cannabis plant, because this is the one that produces those resinous flowers that are able to provide the high that so many marijuana consumers desire. On the other hand, the male cannabis plant, which is also known by some as hemp, might not have any THC present, but it does contain some CBD. Both the female and male cannabis plants have a source of CBD, so they both make suitable options for cannabidiol oil extraction and processing.

* In addition to being female and male, cannabis plants can also be hermaphroditic (a.k.a. both!). Pretty neat right? Hermaphrodite plants are capable of pollinating themselves, because they contain both female and male sex organs.  This is a nuisance though for marijuana growers, because it means their final product will be filled with seeds and the hermaphrodite genetics can be passed down onto other generations, which defeats the purpose of having feminized seeds. To ensure a female plant, either specifically bred feminized seeds can be purchased, or clones of a female cannabis plant.

The structure of a female cannabis plant, also known as the marijuana plant, is typically built up of a stem with roots that dig deep into the earth, with fan leaves and sometimes colas that stick out in between some of the fan/water leaves.  These colas are a mass collection of the buds, which are the flowers and the part of the plant that can get you high.

* These buds contain sugar leaves, which are coated with those crystal-appearing trichomes (the component that directly contains the THC). Additionally, pistils and stigmas are those tiny, usually orange hairs mixed amongst the sugar leaves. Lastly, there are calyxes and bracts, which also contain potent quantities of cannabinoids.

Article by:
Dr. Pierre Milot, PhD, PhD (tc)
Life Transition Counselling / CBD Sales Consulting
Grief Recovery – Clinical Hypnotherapy
Winchester Ontario
Tel: 613 774 4389
www.coaching4life.ca